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Secret Service might not buy spin for Missouri Dem’s Trump assassination ‘hope’

Michelle Malkin - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 16:02

**Written by Doug Powers

Democrat Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal caught the attention of the Secret Service this week:

The US Secret Service is investigating comments made online by a Missouri state lawmaker who reportedly said she hoped President Donald Trump would be assassinated.

Democratic State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal’s comment has since been deleted — but it did not go unnoticed.
“The St. Louis Field Office of the Secret Service is looking into the comments,” Secret Service spokesperson Cathy Milhoan said in a statement to CNN. “The Secret Service investigates all threats against the President, Vice President, and other protectees, whether they be direct, implied or comments in passing.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Chappelle-Nadal’s comment said: “I hope Trump is assassinated!”

The Facebook post was deleted, but Chappelle-Nadal’s being otherwise unapologetic and is refusing calls to resign. The Missouri Democrat has also promoted a petition as a show of support for her “frustration” with Trump, along with one hell of an attempted explanation of the difference between what she said, and what would constitute an actual threat. Get a load of that last sentence:

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“She said kill him but not kill him kill him!”

Odds the Secret Service will buy that explanation: LOW.

**Written by Doug Powers

Twitter @ThePowersThatBe

HuffPost slammed for racy Steve Bannon headline

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 14:56
The liberal Huffington Post website was pressured to change a derogatory homepage headline about the exit of White House strategist Steve Bannon after a social media backlash on Friday.

Missouri governor calls for expulsion of Dem senator who urged Trump assassination

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 14:49
Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens joined calls Friday for state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal to be expelled from the legislature after saying she hopes President Trump is assassinated.

Pelosi touts House push to censure Trump

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 14:45
House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi on Friday touted a campaign to formally censure President Trump following his controversial response to the violence that resulted from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

GOP needs Trump to focus on agenda

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 13:59
Will he be able to?

BANNON OUT: Who is Steve Bannon?

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 12:53
Embattled White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is out at the White House, a source told Fox News Friday.

UN accused of double standard in warning about racism in America

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 12:40
The United Nations is taking heat for warning that “racism and xenophobia are on the rise in America” in the wake of last weekend’s Charlottesville violence – amid criticism that their “sudden concern with anti-Semitism” is “disingenuous” given the U.N.’s past treatment of Israel.

Steve Bannon out at the White House

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 12:30
President Trump's controversial chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving the White House, in another major staff shakeup announced at the close of another tumultuous week in Washington.

Former Trump administration officials, from Bannon to Comey

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 12:15
From the White House chief of staff to the F.B.I. director, from leaving for a new job to learning of his firing from a television, here’s a running list of those who have left the Trump administration.

Steve Bannon out at the White House, source says

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 11:45
President Trump's controversial chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving the White House, in another major staff shakeup announced at the close of another tumultuous week in Washington.

Obama holdovers on president's arts council quit over Charlottesville

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:46
Nearly all the members of the President's Committee on Arts and Humanities resigned Friday in protest of President Trump’s reaction to last weekend’s white supremacist violence in Charlottesville.

No More Fair-Weather Federalism

Cato Recent Op Eds - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 10:22

Ilya Somin

The Republicans are supposed to be the party of state autonomy and strict limits on federal power. But you would not know it based on the first six months of the Trump administration. On a variety of major issues involving immigration, law enforcement, and the “war on drugs,” the administration’s policies exemplify the phenomenon of “fair-weather federalism”: respecting limits on federal power only when politically convenient.

Last week, the city of Chicago filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s plan to coerce “sanctuary cities” into helping enforce federal immigration law. The Justice Department policy threatens to deny cities some federal law-enforcement grants in order to compel obedience. The plan blatantly violates the constitutional requirement that conditions on federal grants must be clearly stated in advance by Congress, so that state and local governments can make an informed choice. They cannot be imposed after the fact by the executive.

In January, President Trump issued an executive order, much like Sessions’s new policy, that unconstitutionally commandeers state officials and imposes new conditions on federal grants — conditions to which the cities never consented. Fortunately, the order was invalidated by a federal court. Ideally, Sessions’s policy will meet the same fate. But the struggle over these issues is far from over.

The Left and the Right can unite to increase state and local autonomy.

Should the administration prevail, it will set a dangerous precedent that goes far beyond the specific issue of sanctuary cities. If the president can unilaterally add new conditions to one federal grant program, he can do the same thing with others. Conservatives who may be cheering Sessions now are likely to regret it when a future Democratic president uses similar tactics to force states to increase gun control or adopt a “common core” curriculum.

Sessions has also undermined federalism by reinstating a federal asset-forfeiture program. Under this policy, known as “equitable sharing,” federal officials work with state law-enforcement agencies to seize the property of people, many of whom have never been charged or convicted of any crime. Asset forfeiture disproportionately victimizes the poor, racial minorities, and others who lack resources and political clout.

The policy also enables state and local law enforcement to profit from these seizures, even in the many states that have banned such practices. The federal program allows law-enforcement agencies to circumvent state restrictions by funneling the assets through the federal government, which then disburses some of the profits back to state and local cops. As a result, law-enforcement agencies will have incentives to prioritize drug cases that are likely to net them money. Curbing violent crime, and other objectives that state governments might value more, will be a lower priority. Control over the funding and priorities of state and local law enforcement is a core element of state sovereignty. Sessions’s asset-forfeiture policy is a frontal attack on it.

The administration also appears to be planning an extensive federal crackdown on marijuana, even in the many states that have legalized it. This too is an assault on state autonomy.

Sadly, the Trump administration and the GOP are far from the only fair-weather federalists in politics. Many of the liberal Democrats currently relying on federalism principles to protect sanctuary cities against Trump decried those very constraints in the past, when they impeded progressive priorities.

Both the Left and the Right could benefit from a more principled commitment to limiting federal power. In a large and diverse nation, it is unlikely that we can find a workable, one-size-fits all approach to numerous contentious policy issues involving law enforcement, health care, and drug use, among others. This is especially true in an era of deep partisan polarization, when Democrats and Republicans are farther apart on most issues than they have been in decades.

Decentralization of power can also help defuse the partisan hatred that is poisoning our politics. If the federal government had less control over our lives, both sides would have less to fear from their opponents’ victories at the national level. Each group could still pursue its preferred policies at the state and local level. Competition and experimentation by states and localities would offer more opportunities for people to better their lot by voting with their feet and moving to new locales.

Some people understandably fear that restricting federal power might open the door to oppressive state and local policies. The federal government undoubtedly has a role to play in enforcing constitutional rights and preventing unconstitutional discrimination by state and local governments. But carrying out those functions does not require anything approaching the sweeping authority currently wielded by Washington. Robust federal antidiscrimination efforts do not require virtually unlimited federal power to regulate anything that might have some effect on the economy, or nearly unconstrained federal authority to use conditional grants to pressure states and localities to do their bidding. As the sanctuary-cities litigation demonstrates, the latter is likely to be a menace to vulnerable minority groups rather than a benefit to them. Moreover, unlike in some previous eras, many minority groups today often have greater clout at the state and local level than in Washington.

Since the election of Trump, leading progressive scholars such as National Constitution Center president Jeffrey Rosen and Yale Law School dean Heather Gerken have urged the Left to take a more favorable view of federalism. Left and Right are unlikely to come to a complete consensus on federalism any time soon. But there is considerable potential for agreement nonetheless. A new bipartisan and cross-ideological appreciation for limits on federal power could become one of the few beneficial developments of the Trump era. Together, we might yet make federalism great again.

Ilya Somin is a professor of law at George Mason University, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and the author of Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter.

Trump approves plan to create independent cyber command

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 09:59
President Donald Trump has approved a long-delayed Pentagon plan to create an independent and more aggressive cyber command in order to beef up cyberwar operations against the Islamic State group and other foes.

Push to strip Confederate emblem from Mississippi flag heats up

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 09:03
Mississippi lawmakers are renewing calls to change the state flag, which prominently features the Confederate emblem, after violence erupted during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend.

Trump DOJ ends Holder-era 'Operation Choke Point'

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 08:46
The Trump Justice Department is ending an Obama-era program that had attempted to cut off credit to shady businesses but came under fire from Republicans for unfairly targeting gun dealers and other legitimate operations.

Trump DOJ ends Obama-era 'Operation Choke Point'

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 08:46
The Trump Justice Department is ending an Obama-era program that had attempted to cut off credit to shady businesses but came under fire from Republicans for unfairly targeting gun dealers and other legitimate operations.

Dem infighting over abortion ‘litmus test’ poses new headache

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 08:30
Washington Democrats are facing a new backlash from pro-choice and liberal groups, after a party leader declared no "litmus test" for pro-life, 2018 House candidates.

Moderate Dems fret over Warren claims of progressive takeover

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 08:25
Moderate Democrats are taking Sen. Elizabeth Warren to task over her claim that the liberal wing has taken over the party.

Trump slams ‘Obstructionist Democrats’ as danger to national security

Fox News (Politics) - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 07:52
President Trump accused “Obstructionist Democrats” on Friday of hurting national security by waging court fights against his policies, in an apparent reference to the battle over his travel ban and other measures that could get renewed attention following the terror attacks in Spain.

Ending Government Schools Does Not Mean Ending Public Education

TownHall Latest columns - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 07:17
My dream of a nation free from government schools and odious teachers unions, wherein parents responsible enough to bring another human into this world are also responsible enough to ensure that human is educated without the governments help, is unlikely to soon become reality. However, further limiting the influence of our current, failing, monopolistic education system would move us closer to the educational vision imagined by our Founding Fathers.

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